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[Whodunnit Pt. 2] Let Him Have It…

Posted by Lex Fear on June 10, 2009

Back in February I had a long comment discussion with an atheist called Postsimian which started on a post at The Friendly Atheist, but went off topic so I brought it here.

Whilst not intended, this makes an excellent follow-up to that post – Killing In The Name Of…

The gist of the discussion was one of hermeneutics. Postsimian argued that ‘if’ there was a God, he was evil, because of the certain events and commands given by God in the Old Testament, taken literally. My argument was that, as well as the need for proper exegetical context, there is a need for a greater perspective on what is written in the OT, which relies heavily on if we deem the events real or made-up.

The crux of the matter was whether God, assumedly being good, could be capable of evil – i.e. killing seemingly innocent people. Postsimians study of the OT led him to conclude that even if God is good, he is capable of evil, whereas my study of the bible leads me to conclude that certain acts of God which seem wrong on the face of it, are not when understood in context.

It later occured to me that this argument is demonstrated aptly in a film I watched years ago based on the true story of Derek Bentley called Let Him Have It. The premise of the film is of a robbery which goes disasterously wrong. During the attempted arrest, brain-damaged Bentley yells out to his younger accomplice “Let him have it” – referring to the gun, and subsequently his accomplice, Christopher Craig, shoots the policeman. For those not in the know, “Let him have it” used to be a turn of phrase in the UK for giving the go-ahead to attack someone. The question is: Did Bentley order Craig to hand over the gun, or fire it at the copper?

The real-life case, in actual fact, did not hinge upon these words, but it does prove useful for this exercise. For the police, by yelling “let him have it” Bentley was giving the order to shoot, and was therefore intending evil, and rightly deserved the death penalty. For the defence, Bentley was ordering Craig to hand over the gun and surrender.

The fact is, without any supporting evidence apart from the reading of Bentleys words, your view of Bentleys guilt will be based on your own preconceptions and bias. If you were not British and raised in the time of the 50’s you may well think that Bentley ordered Craig to surrender. However, if you were around at the time, you may have thought differently.

By now you know what I’m getting at. This is nearly the same problem when it comes to reading biblical texts literally. No, God is not going around in the OT ordering people to shoot other people, but there are times when he has commanded specific instructions and left it for his people to interpret and then act, or intercede.

More and more, it seems to me that what is not written in the OT scriptures, is more important than what is actually written.

In the end, Postsimian may be right after all about one thing, in some cases it seems like it is a mere subtle nuance. However, I must counterbalance this with the truth that in every instance of the OT where God orders the destruction of human life, as the law required (just like the American justice system), when people either interceded or pleaded for mercy, they were shown mercy.

This is why if you are going to honestly critique the Old Testament, you cannot read it literally. You need to be prepared to study a bit of history and culture at the same time. It is also why I feel I cannot emphasise enough, that God is not looking for people to carry out judgement (under the law), but instead he is looking for people to intercede and carry out mercy and forgiveness (when the law has been broken).

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Posted in Apologetics, Justice & Mercy, Laymans Theology, Xianity | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

[Whodunnit] Killing In The Name Of…

Posted by Lex Fear on February 26, 2009

I have been debating an atheist called postsimian over at The Friendly Atheist but it’s getting far too long and off topic now so I’ve decided to post a response back here.

I said I’d respond if PS persuaded me of his/her arguments and after reading his/her last response there are a couple of things I do have to concede. Yep shock horror.

If you want to follow the debate from the beginning, head over and read the comments on Hermant’s post: Foxhole Atheist Jeremy Hall Tells His Story.

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Apologetics, Laymans Theology, Morals & Ethics, The Religious Wrong | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments »

[Atheism] Probably

Posted by Lex Fear on February 15, 2009

I was really happy to see the atheist bus campaign get into full swing. God Bless those atheists, another medium for which they can use to rage against their parents.

I have purposefully held off from writing about it until now, after the dust has settled and things can be fully absorbed.

I’ll start by saying I also found myself disappointed by the weakness of the message. I would much preferred something more assertive, more disdainful of religion. Instead we get probably.

Funnily enough all sorts of speculation took place in the atheist blogosphere and fora as to why include the word. There were some rather feeble apologetics using such idioms as “intellectually honest”.

Since I had followed this saga from it’s inception and was following the commentary at The Friendly Atheist I thought I should help bring clarity to the perception of the ‘Christian response’ as well as information as to how probably got in there:

1) British Christians views on the signs range from ‘Meh’ to ‘Great! More opportunities to talk about God”.

The fact is the Christian religion is led by a man who was violently, brutally killed as a convicted criminal – Call it insane if you will but most genuine Christians see persecution in any form as a privelege and opportunity to stand with Christ and spread the gospel!

Through history, the church has done better in times of persecution and it will always.

2) There are a few who are weak in faith and perhaps new Christians, or they have lost their way and these will protest.. and when they do the media will always give them the microphone to broadcast their ignorance.

But so far the worst response I’ve heard from any Christian is that it’s silly. That’s it.

3) I personally wish that they had dropped the ‘probably’ and gone for something much stronger. I wish it DID say “THERE IS NO GOD”.. with it the slogan is very poor and really isn’t worthy to be considered an attack or something like that. (Also the excuse given to include “probably” has to be the weakest excuse I have ever heard- very stupid)

The proposer of this campaign – a Grauniad journalist – originally gave the reason that she had seen ‘probably’ used in another ad (see Carlsberg) and assumed it was for legal reasons. It’s not, it’s a nod to the British talent for understatement. Silly woman!

Must try harder.

Which was quickly refuted by a commenter called Aj:

The Committee of Advertising Practice (CAP) advised her that “the inclusion of the word ‘probably’ makes it less likely to cause offence, and therefore be in breach of the Advertising Code.”

Lots of people are getting this wrong, so here’s a quote. Lots of atheists don’t believe “there is no god”, they can only agree with statements like “there is probably no god, although I and others prefer “almost certainly” as it’s more accurate.

He went on to include a quote from Ariane Sherine (from a later article).

There’s another reason I’m keen on the “probably”: it means the slogan is more accurate, as even though there’s no scientific evidence at all for God’s existence, it’s also impossible to prove that God doesn’t exist (or that anything doesn’t).

Oh dear, how intellectually dishonest. He left me no choice but to quote the original article by Sherine in response:

“After that, I Googled Carlsberg and found this marketing site, which suggests that using the word “probably” at the start of the ad saved Carlsberg from litigation.” – Ariane Sherine, Atheists – Gimme Five, 20/06/08

Long before the article you quoted. They’ve given all manner of excuses since then.

And the Carlsberg Ad:

http://www.brandrepublic.com/Campaign/News/472122/Scandinavia-Great-nordic-conquerors/

“According to Jakob Knudsen, Carlsberg’s international brand director: “The Scandinavian understated sense of humour is an integral part of the brand’s DNA. If you take other premium Scandinavian brands such as Bang & Olufsen, they won’t tell you they’re the best. Instead, they let the quality speak for itself.”

Only America would produce, “King of Beers” or “World’s Finest” and market their products as the biggest, best, favourite, fastest, greatest etc…

This advertising (up until recently perhaps) would never work in the UK, but picture 2 blokes in a pub, one declares “This is the best lager I’ve ever tasted!”, the other, being British is likely to respond “I don’t think so, I think I’ve tasted better.” But if the first was to casually mention “This is probably the best lager I’ve ever tasted” then the other may likely agree with him “Probably.”

Typical MSM journalist, gets her research from an internet forum rather than the source.

Oddly, no-one then seemed interesting in arguing the point with me and just ignored my second comment completely. Not what you would expect from intellectually honest people but there you go.

Here’s a great quote from Lib Dem MP, Martin Turner:

Imagine that you saw any of the following advertisements:
“The speed camera probably isn’t loaded”
“You probably won’t die in a car crash”
“You probably did turn off the gas”
Telling someone that something probably won’t happen doesn’t stop them worrying about it. Quite the contrary. And, if the millions of lottery ticket buyers are anything to go by, telling someone that something they very much hope for is unlikely to happen does nothing to stop them hoping.
If “there’s probably no God” is the strongest statement that, on reflection, atheists dare to make in public, then they have moved a long way from the certainties implied in their name.

But my favourite quote on worry has to this:

“Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more important than food, and the body more important than clothes? Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they? Who of you by worrying can add a single hour to his life?” – Jesus

As well as beating The Grauniad to the post by almost 2000 years, there’s something rather more elegant, meaningful and poetic than “Now stop worrying and enjoy your life”, don’t you think (if you are being intellectually honest)?

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Posted in Apologetics, Doublespeak, Doublethink, Duh!, Laymans Theology, Londonland, Minitruth, Opinion, Propaganda, Quoteyness, The Love of Libel, Uncircumcised Philistines, V for Vendetta, Warring Memes | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

[Bugaboos] 20 Reasons To Abandon Christianity… And Every Reason To Take It Up Again

Posted by Lex Fear on January 25, 2009

From Pass_the_Aura – 20 Reasons to Abandon a Bugaboo:

6. Christianity breeds authoritarianism. … If your nonintrusive beliefs or actions are not in accord with Christian “morality,” you can bet that Christians will feel completely justified—not to mention righteous—in poking their noses (often in the form of state police agencies) into your private life.

  • But Jesus called them to Himself and said, “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and those who are great exercise authority over them. Yet it shall not be so among you; but whoever desires to become great among you, let him be your servant. And whoever desires to be first among you, let him be your slave—just as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.” (Matthew 20:25–28 NKJV)
  • [Jesus speaking] “Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven.” (Luke 6:37 NIV)
  • “Therefore you have no excuse, O man, every one of you who judges. For in passing judgment on another you condemn yourself, because you, the judge, practice the very same things.” (Romans 2:1 ESV)

I’m coming to the same realisation that many people reject God based on characterisation are not actually rejecting the God described in the bible, or the God I have come to know and love.

Here are six things God hates,
and one more that he loathes with a passion:
eyes that are arrogant,
a tongue that lies,
hands that murder the innocent,
a heart that hatches evil plots,
feet that race down a wicked track,
a mouth that lies under oath,
a troublemaker in the family. – Proverbs (Message)

If you hate these things, you and God may have a lot more in common than you think.

Last year Pass_the_Aura did an excellent YouTube response to all the atheists who thought they were committing the ultimate unforgivable sin, see my post here:

Absolutely Unforgiveable?

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Posted in Apologetics, Blogidarity, Laymans Theology, Quoteyness | Tagged: , , , , , | 4 Comments »

[Comment Sharing] The Wrath of God

Posted by Lex Fear on November 13, 2008

Over at The County Shrink, a heartfelt response to a reluctant atheist:

Believe it or not, I at one time, was in a similar position. You have a
lot of questions about Christianity. So did I. And we are not alone.
All believers have doubts at times. In fact, I think doubt is a
necessary part of faith. It wouldn’t be called faith, if there was no
doubt.

Reluctant atheist Nick, left a further comment below the post:

I badly want to throw the towel in, and believe again. but i can’t accept the unmerciful side of God.

I didn’t want to risk an online debate particularly because it’s my first comment at TCS but I felt compelled to make a respond with the following (now I just wish I could find the motivation to write my own blog posts):

For me, doubt has been an essential component of my faith. It has been doubt that has steered me to believe.

Each time I question the bible, God, events or my experience, I find simple reasons to walk away from it all.. which is a problem for me, it’s too simple. Christianity is complex and causes a serious enquirer such as myself to think. On the other hand, as an atheist (11 years ago) I never really had much to consider.

There are places in the bible where God intervenes which makes him appear unmerciful, angry even. Once again this indicates that God is a rational being, not just a one-dimensional character-piece in a made up religion.

Nick, I can see you are wrestling with some deep-seated theological questions. May I suggest you read CS Lewis – The Problem of Pain. Also I find the bible itself lends a hand when it comes to understanding Gods mercy – Romans 9:22.

In the UK here we have just had a horrific case of child abuse that has hit the headlines. If we accept that God can see the future and destinies of all people, would it be fair for God to intervene before the abuse happened (eg. prevented the child from being born in order to spare it). For God to then strike down the adults involved before the child was born, punish them before society was even aware of their evil nature?

Perhaps, and we can’t say for certain whether this is already happening since we only have the benefit of hindsight and not the ability to predict destinies.

However, the very existence of evil in this world is an indication of Gods patience and mercy. If one examines the old testament, one sees that when God planned to wipe out a city or a tribe, he always revealed his plans to his prophets first, or he would make his people agents in the destruction. Since God is God, and can destroy as easily as bring to life, why would he approach his people beforehand, or even request they carry out these actions?

Perhaps it is easier to frame it in terms of modern law. Say I was caught speeding, but when I was pulled over the officer can see I have my pregnant wife in the car who is in labour and needs to get to the hospital. What police officer will hold me up, read out my rights and issue me with a ticket whilst my wifes contractions get shorter and shorter in the seat next to me.

I have broken traffic law by speeding, for sure, but any reasonable police officer is going to make a decision to allow the law-break in this instance. Even if some jobsworth officer still decides to issue a ticket.. it’s likely a judge would cancel it on appeal – despite the law, as set by government, being broken.

Laws make society work, but they are never meant to be nor should be used to totalitarian effect. A government that becomes totalitarian in application of its laws will lose the support of its people and risk uprising or rebellion.

In the same way, God made laws for his people, and offered them the choice to live by them or not. When they chose to live by them, and signed the contract, then the law had to be obeyed. But God, rather than simply enforce the law with impunity, instead entrusted the enforcement to his people, continually involving them in his plans to carry out the actions and punishment related to the laws being broken.

So again we must ask, why would God approach prophets before carrying out punishment; Why does the government employ judges to effect it’s laws (considering where the concept of ‘judges’ was taken from)?

My belief is this: God was not looking for people to carry out his wrath, he was looking for intercessors, perhaps even people to debate with him and refuse to carry out said wrath.

How would we know mercy, if there were no laws, no righteousness or ultimate authority to ensure they were carried out.

And how would God reveal his mercy without giving power to judge and carry out punishment, to his creation?

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[Acts of God] Hearts and Minds

Posted by Lex Fear on September 25, 2008

Two pieces of good news today which gives me pause for thought… Filesharer Jammie Thomas has been granted a retrial by the judge who sentenced her last year.

“Minnesota Federal beak Michael Davis said he had given an incorrect instruction to the jury on the level of proof required by the Recording Industry Ass. of America. He had told jurors last year that the act of “making [music files] available” via a peer to peer network was sufficient to prove unauthorised distribution of copyright material without evidence that others had downloaded the files.”

<snip>

Although he wasn’t considering the fine levied against Thomas in the original trial, in his judgment Davis said Congress should re-examine the law on copyright infringement, calling it “wholly disproportionate”. “Her alleged acts were illegal, but common. Her status as a consumer who was not seeking to harm her competitors or make a profit does not excuse her behavior. But it does make the award of hundreds of thousands of dollars in damages unprecedented and oppressive,” he wrote.” – RIAA filesharing target Jammie Thomas wins retrial – El Reg

The second bit of good news, however it comes with a twist, is the European Parliament have wisely thrown out the “Three-Strikes” law when it comes to copyright infringement.

“The amendment, drafted by Guy Bono and other members of the European Parliament, was adopted by an overwhelming majority. 573 parliament members voted in favor while only 74 rejected. Satisfied with this outcome, Bono stated in a response to the vote: “You do not play with individual freedoms like that,” and said that the French government should review its three-strikes law.” – European Parliament Says No to Three-Strikes Law – TorrentFreak

Could this be a possible turning point in history, are our leaders finally coming round to the 21st Century and understanding of technology and innovation?

I’ve always believed in a God that is involved with life on earth in both a grand and intimate scale. I don’t believe God sends earthquakes and tornadoes in order to bring punishment to any region, I don’t believe he speaks and commands suicide bombers or terrorists to fly into buildings, but I do believe he is intimately involved in human affairs to bring about creativity and invention, justice and mercy.

I believe in a creative God, a God who fashioned humans in his image – that means we got his characteristic creativity as well. It is on display everywhere we look; invention, design, industry and the arts. Creation is in us and is a part of our human identity. I also believe, in a broader sense, that Jesus was and is a file sharer.

Jesus’ primary goal was to get the good news out. He didn’t care much for any authority that stood in the way, and he certainly didn’t issue copyright disclaimers on his stories or words. If he had, we might never had heard of the carpenter from Galilee. If Jesus was physically walking the earth today, I believe that he would be utilizing p2p networks to share all sorts of Christian media – words, songs and movies. The RIAA would probably play the part of the Romans (on behalf of copyright owners such as Hillsong) and do their bit to crucify him for this, of course.

The point is, BitTorrent is a creative invention. It is a great invention for spreading information more quickly and efficiently than any other source on the tubes. I believe God has had a hand in human invention from the beginning, gifting us with ideas and intellect, and I believe he has his hand in technology even today.

They burned the first man to translate the Bible into English in an attempt to supress the free sharing of this valuable information with the common people. How quickly they forgot that sharing of information and communion is at the core of the Christian message, and how lost are we now that the church employs the very same techniques as the world to ‘protect’ it’s ‘intellectual property’? The church has forgotten the words of the psalmist in Psalm 24:1.

So although many on both sides may disagree with me for different reasons, I believe that God has had his hand on proceedings in both of these cases today. I believe God wants us to have an open and free society more than anyone can realise or imagine. He doesn’t have to place the literal ideas in our head, or force our hands to work, he has already created the desire, the passion and the spirit, this is all that is needed for justice and creativity to prevail.

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Posted in Apologetics, Copywrong, Justice & Mercy, Laymans Theology, Opinion, Technology, The Purpose Missing Church | 1 Comment »

[Atheism] How To Destroy Christianity

Posted by Lex Fear on April 12, 2008

I’m pretty fed up of the same circular arguments and debates going round and round the tubes. Based on logical fallacies, false premises and rabid hate.

So listen closely I’m about to reveal the truth that Christians don’t want you to know. It’s hidden in their own book, the bible, and all you need to do is point out the evidence, one simple line, and you will end their faith. You will completely decimate it.

There is no need to mention Occam’s Razor, the 3rd law of thermodynamics, the Jesus Seminar, logic and reason, counter-arguments, semantics, OT eschatology, Witty Diatribes, Pseudoscience, the Da Vinci code, the FSM or the celestial teapot.

It was written long ago by one of the founders of Christianity, hidden in plain sight, the means to bring Christianity and belief in Jesus crashing to the ground. Simply prove this and even the most God-fearing, bible-bashing fundie will be stumped.

Here is the verse, from 1 Corinthians 15:13-16 of the New Testament, written by Paul:

“If there is no resurrection of the dead, then not even Christ has been raised. And if Christ has not been raised, our preaching is useless and so is your faith. More than that, we are then found to be false witnesses about God, for we have testified about God that he raised Christ from the dead. But he did not raise him if in fact the dead are not raised. For if the dead are not raised, then Christ has not been raised either. And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile;”

It’s that simple. If there is no resurrection of the dead, no resurrection of Jesus Christ, then their words are false and faith is futile.

If you want to rid the world of Christianity, all you have to do is prove that Jesus Christ did not rise from the dead. Should be an easy task, right?

Watch the faith drain from their eyes and their expression fill with doubt… go get ’em tiger!

Posted in Apologetics, Laymans Theology, Religion & Science, The Purpose Missing Church, The Religious Wrong, V for Vendetta, Warring Memes, WhatTheyDontWantU2C | 24 Comments »

RSS Clearout: August 2007

Posted by Lex Fear on September 9, 2007

The lowdown on my RSS feeds for August. Before I start, I just want to say that Google has now added a search feature to it’s Reader, which now makes it oh so easy to find older items when you have a vague recollection. Yay.

Missional Position

Garet Pahl of Mongrel Horde features a video of John Piper preaching against the prosperity gospel. I don’t think I’ve heard anything clearer and more concise than this as to why it’s borderline heresy and should not be an agenda of the church.

Matt shares some information on a new archeological find. You may not agree with the bible, but can you really still claim it’s a work of fiction?

On his blog Power of Suggestion, Elmo writes about a discussion with his brother-in-law based on Dawkin’s God Delusion. His bro-in-law asks the old and tired stock question “If God created the universe, who created God?”. Which could equally be said of the multi-verse. His counter-points analysis of The God Delusion starts here, including a link to B-I-L post.

We know the Cross, and the Ichthys, What happened to the Rooster?

A mega-church cancels a veterans funeral upon discovering he was gay. There’s a few things I shall say here. For one, it is entirely up to the church’s discretion who they want to bury. My question is, if the guy was not even a member, why should his sexual preference even come into it? If you’re going to bury people who are not Christians or church members then refusing to bury someone who was gay is hypocritical to me. Kudos to the church though, they offered to pay for the funeral to be hosted at another site, which I think is not unreasonable.

A huge debate exploded on Emerging Grace’s blog, over Team Pyro’s posters featuring their interpretation of the values of the Emerging Church. I featured one of the posters in a previous post. I thought they were funny as heck.

I had an interesting debate over at The Osterley Times regarding the churches stance on abortion. Notice how the Roman Catholic Church was brought into the debate without my reference to it, considering the God’s Warriors video was discussing fundamental evangelicals. More on God’s Warriors here.

If it was possible to reincarnate, how would you actually enforce against it? Wouldn’t it be like ordering the wind to get permission before it blew?

Cecilieaux makes some interesting philosophical observations on the state of fallen human nature (though he probably wouldn’t use that term) and the redundancy of ‘innocent until proven guilty’. It causes one to wonder about how we make and enforce laws.

Cranmer weighs in on calls to ban the Qur’an in the Netherlands. His Grace rightly asserts that books should be conquered with the pen, not with state control as this atheist advocates. Ironically, the Dutch MP calling for this ban is the leader of the Dutch ‘Freedom Party’. Presumably some people are more free than others.

Ex-Pastor Haggard still has some lessons to learn about humility, it seems.

Speculation

The Guardian reported that house prices are destined to soar by 40%. It’s really up to the first time buyers, do you want to continue being conned? Makes sense that the banks would want interest rates to stay high unfortunate, but necessary.

Stef at Famous For 15 Megapixels has an innovative list of things to do in London before you f*** off out of here.

Probably one of the reasons for the runaway market has to be that home-hunters only take 17 minutes to make a decision.

You didn’t know that banks borrow money? Oh poor you. Yep, they all unite to keep you screwed. Who can blame them- they’re feeling the fury of their victims.

Credit Card companies have devised ingenious new ways to add charges. After 3… what a surprise!

Incompetent Leadership

The Osterley Times features a video of Donald Rumsfeld being questioned on propaganda strategies regarding the invasion of Iraq. Guess what, he tries to divert all questioning to everyone else before settling on “I don’t recall”. The only thing he seems sure about during the questioning is that they “don’t have a scrap of evidence” to prove a cover-up. See my previous post on these complete idiots who can’t ever recall. This man deserves no respect.

Should a man who cannot drive or ride even a bicycle really dictate policy for the roads, creating more and more ways to get fined? Well that’s what happens in London, read Neil Herron’s post.

Phil Taylor reports that Parking Services Councillors are to become mystery shoppers to test out Ealing’s parking enforcement. For it to be a fair test they should be given a job interview to get to in the centre of town, a cheque to cash and no spare change in their pockets. Alternatively substitute the job interview with two children to drop off/pick up from creche. Phil also noticed something peculiar about the Mayors propaganda rag, pretty faces.

If you were wondering how bidding for government contracts works, Dilbert has an excellent cartoon demonstrating this, via Ideal Government.

A council wrongly scraps a family car, another one of those fantastic policies introduced to fight crime which ends up being turned on innocents.

There is at least one smart politician in the UK.

LWTC gives a snippet of an interview between John Pilger and David Monroe on how individuals like Rupert Murderoch gets away with paying little tax. Also read his thoughts on boycotting the US and Israel (and UK when abroad), there’s lots of debate around whether boycotting should include vandalism and other criminal behaviour.

Camp Okutta trains children to in Canada to use AK-47’s and land-mines, which some people may think is wrong.

Despite how funny it is that Bush is once again saying the opposite of what he said before, his comparison to pulling out of Vietnam is only preparation for the inevitable implosion that is going to happen when America pulls out. This is why I say Bush, or one of the shadow Presidents need to swallow their pride and ask the UN to step in when they pull out. To not do so would be immoral and the only reason would be for them to declare, “we told you so”.

RedBlueChristian features some stupid quotes from politicians. I would have thought the post would be much longer given the wealth of material.

London Mayor again, this time he’s glorifying terrorism. Don’t get me wrong, I like Nelson Mandela, but I’m not the government setting ridiculous laws am I?

Media Madness

The Independent reported that a rich tyrant complained about his treatment in his attempt control the media and influence public opinion.

Elitist kids show their true colours. I’m not a fan of the Chav culture, and enjoy the odd joke but I sometimes think the reaction towards this culture is basically the same threatening behaviour dressed up in middle-class attire.

ISP’s grow concerned that the BBC’s new iPlayer might cause blockage in the tubes. More money for the building of extra tubes should solve the problem.

Josh at Silent Speaking noted journalist Stu Byofsky for the Philadelphia Daily News, was calling for another 9/11 to save America. Whilst it is noted that Byofsky later apologised, it’s not difficult to make a leap from that to conspiracy theories that 9/11 was an inside job. I note that many can’t imagine that the American government could be behind it, but governments have been murdering their own people since the beginning of time. It’s not beyond the imagination of this journalist that in a twisted bid to unite a country and find new sources of energy, a government would try to manufacture an enemy attack.

Stef writes on the importance of local knowledge and possibly coins a new (grr.) meme. Couldn’t have chosen a better title for the summit of the leaders of the worlds largest countries.

No-one disses The Hoff.

A sufferer of PTSD tries to justify being a murderer, but doesn’t succeed. I am not surprised since PTSD is not strictly a mental disability such as schizophrenia, I have had arguments about this before on the blog.

David Duff features a quote from Dr Dairymple and there is no truer analysis. It is not Times readers, it’s the poor who are the victims of most crime. Typically, those without a voice, who may not even have online presence.

Viacom once again act like pricks, this time they get caught out. Previous posts featuring Viacom’s aggressive business strategy.

Scientific Consensus

It appears Human and Neanderthal co-existed, shooting out of the water, the theory they were our direct ancestors. As Regis Nicoll points out, rather than question the theory, they just keep moving the evolutionary goal-posts.

Denyse O’Leary discusses a recent article by Phillip Johnson (the ‘Godfather’ of ID) on the exasperation of a Science Professor trying to convince his students of the Evolutionary process. The conclusion is that of a two-brained student. One that can give correct answers when questioned on evolutionary biology but holds personal ‘heretical’ beliefs. All I have to say is what I don’t hear many asking- If something is real and conclusive, it shouldn’t be too hard to educate someone on it. For example there is a theory that if you plant a seed, something will eventually grow out of the soil. This theory is proved and relied upon by farmers all over the world. A person would be crazy to argue against it, so why is it so difficult to teach evolution? Also, check out this follow up article on vested interests in the debate, and how hard-line evolutionists are shooting themselves in the foot.

Satellite data contradicts global warming hysteria, as the informed Wat Tyler points out. As I’ve been trying to warn people all along, it’s global cooling we should be worried about.

Baudrillards Bastard warns about the dangers of Cybereugenticism and highlights recent botched abortion in Italy.

A really good website from Alan Weisman, A World Without Us. It doesn’t seem to be making any political statement, though it did make me think of that other fiction event: the Rapture.

Technically Speaking

LWTC writes a post defending Microsoft’s new XML document format. Personally I’ve started sending out documents in .odt format. I don’t mind people emailing back saying they can’t read it and can I send a word document, but how else is the revolution going to get started?

Readprint is a new online service for free book reading. I’m psyched because not only can I now read 1984, I have bookmarked it into my new Nokia E65 web-browser which I can HTML surf through any Wi-Fi connection!

Has it really got so bad that Microsoft must now get court orders to force people to install Windows? One question, how is this going to be monitored. Do the authorities know about duel-booting?

Sony have been at it again. When will they learn.

Nacho from the Language Trainers UK blog, discusses affective connotations. Required reading for bloggers, I think.

Posted in Absolute Power, Apologetics, Bad Company, Bank Robbers, Copywrong, Financial Terrorism, Global Alarming, Justice & Mercy, Laymans Theology, Little Hitlers, Londonland, Morals & Ethics, Pharisees, Property Market, Religion & Science, RSS Clear Out, The Purpose Missing Church, The Religious Wrong, Warring Memes, Wealth Creation | 3 Comments »

God Hates…

Posted by Lex Fear on September 8, 2007

You know, I’ve not been able to find a direct scriptural verse that say God hates homosexuals, but I can find one that says God hates divorce.

“I hate divorce,” says the LORD God of Israel, “and I hate a man’s covering himself with violence as well as with his garment,” says the LORD Almighty. So guard yourself in your spirit, and do not break faith.” – Book of Malachi ca. 420 BC

Sounds more like church without Holy Spirit, rather than Church Without Walls. I will maintain a shred of respect if they do not date or marry anyone else, however this is apparently, for both, their second marriage.

 

Posted in Apologetics, Laymans Theology, Morals & Ethics, Pharisees, The Purpose Missing Church | Leave a Comment »

RSS Clearout: June-July 2007

Posted by Lex Fear on September 2, 2007

Part 2 of my attempt to catch up with my feeds. Read on for blogs/news that I had an opinion on but no time to share. Some good ones for these months so take your time…

Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Absolute Power, Apologetics, Bad Company, Bank Robbers, Copywrong, Financial Terrorism, Laymans Theology, Little Hitlers, Pharisees, Propaganda, Property Market, Religion & Science, RSS Clear Out, Technology, The Purpose Missing Church, The Religious Wrong, Uncircumcised Philistines, Xenophobia | Leave a Comment »